NextFab Blog

Weekly Staff Picks, January 8, 2011

Posted by admin

Jan 8, 2012 9:38:00 AM

It’s been a little while since we posted our weekly links due the the holidays. We have a collection of links for you today that span technology and art and some that combine both. Please enjoy!


lighting bag by Wonsik Chae. - Brandon


The art and Science of CNC Waterjet and Laser Cutting   Major custom metalwork company in Brooklyn does some beautiful laser cutting, water-jet cutting, and bending for architecture, art, and interiors. Check out their videos too. - Evan


Laser cut artwork + bicycles + cameras = awesome
If attached to a bike wheel and filmed in motion this intricate paper cutout will animate to create lovely fluid movements; cogs turning and clouds growing and the like…I intend for these to be presented as art objects as in the pictures. I must stress, as I have many times with this project, this is about animation. It is not possible to see this with the naked eye. If you stick this on your bike you will not be able to see it unless you are filming it, I will include instructions on how to film it but I really see these more as pieces of art. - Alex


Self healing circuitry? Has any one seen our T-1000 around? - Gregg


Paper Powered Batteries   Students-destroy your failed assessments and cool down your beer at the same time! - Matt 


Wearable iPod Interface   Apple may be working on a wearable iPod with Siri. - Gregg

Topics: electronics, alternative-energy, bicycle, waterjet, laser-cut, Uncategorized, nextfab, cnc

Hive 76/NextFab Collider

Posted by admin

Dec 23, 2011 3:59:00 PM

We had a great time Tuesday night with our members and fellow maker group Hive 76 members!


We kicked off the 5-hour make session with food, introductions, and some brainstorming for collaborative projects that we were excited about completing during the event. 



Hive76 members got some demos on our machines such as our Trotec laser cutters, Roland CNC mill, and our Brother Digital Embroidery machine. Snowflakes generated from evilmadscientist were laser cut and engraved with a holiday-themed message from Hive76 and NextFab Studio. Some were wired with LEDs in our electronics lab. 



As projects were being discussed, we gave demos on our PCB fabrication process, soft switch construction, and brass CNC engraving. One of our members and a Hive76 member had an idea for a “chair jousting” target apparatus (yes, it is exactly how it sounds), and make it, we did. 



Thank you to all of our members who came in and to Hive76 for a great night of making and mingling! 


Also, thank you to musician Jack Myers (http://www.myspace.com/jackmyersmusic) who played live music for the event. 


Hope to see you all again soon!


Happy Holidays!

Topics: electronics, hackerspaces, Uncategorized, nextfab-studio, hackers, hive, makers, fabrication-processes, laser-cutters, hive76, nextfab, collaboration, cnc

Weekly Staff Picks, October 22, 2011

Posted by admin

Oct 23, 2011 3:14:42 PM

Our Staff Picks for this week include woodworking, CNC, PhotoShop instruction and fashion.   We hope you enjoy them.




When to use Opacity versus Fill in PhotoShop   For all you photoshop geeks I must share this one, because for many years, I just couldn’t tell the difference. Why would they even put it there? Now I know!!! - Yulia



Scintillating CNC Zonahedral Structures: The Zome from Robert Bell   “The Zome is a creation of Rob Bell…and is one of the most ingenious structures of modern geometric times.   The complex, fluid shapes are designed in SketchUp, cut out flat [on a ShopBot], and put together with nothing but time, sweat, sandwich breaks and large mallets.” - Alex



Expanding Round Table   This is a video of a round table that expands.   This is extremely creative woodworking. - Brandon



Master hat designer Elvis Pompilio goes 3D printing   3D printed high fashion hat.   This is something that could not have been made with traditional methods.   Yes, it is THAT awesome. - Alex



Carbon Fiber Porsche 911   This maker takes a modern car and improves upon it by replacing the steel body with a carbon fiber one. - Gregg

Topics: porsche, carbon-fiber, photoshop, 3d-printing, Uncategorized, woodworking, shopbot, nextfab, cnc

More Classes

Posted by admin

Jul 18, 2011 2:30:00 PM

I have taken more classes.   I have taken the first part of the Trotec Laser Cutter/Engraver class, the first part of the TorchMate CNC Plasma Cutter class and the first part of the ShopBot class.   Each of these machines is a fantastic tool.  


All of these machines are software controlled so time is spent learning how to use the software.   Adobe Illustrator, which is available on our computers, can be used to create 2D engrave-able images for cutting out or engraving on the Trotec and TorchMate.  


In the Trotec Laser class, one of our members made a business card out of MDF particleboard and another engraved on a piece of plastic.   We were shown how to go through the process of setting up our files and how to set up the Trotec for different materials.   We were also told of the hazards associated with this machine and how to avoid crashing the bed into the laser.   There is a tray of sample materials to touch and look though with setting information.  


With the TorchMate we did not make anything, that is for the second class.   While we focused on the software, the instructor did demonstrate how to inspect the machine for wear and how to replace those parts as well as how to change the different pieces for different settings for different materials.


In the ShopBot class, after being shown how to use some features of the software, two of the members made engraved cutting boards.   The ShopBot now has a vacuum bed to hold work pieces in place and there is some experimentation going on with this.   It is being improved by our staff.   It’s very cool.  


I definitely have some ideas to put these tools to work.  

Topics: adobe-illustrator, laser-engraver, laser-etcher, torchmate, Uncategorized, shopbot, trotec, laser-cutter, plasma-cutter, cnc, illustrator

New Vacuum Bed on the ShopBot!

Posted by admin

Jul 14, 2011 2:43:00 PM

Ever since I saw a vacuum bed in action at the ShopBot factory last year, I’ve wanted to have a vacuum system on NextFab’s ShopBot. As part of our renovations, I finally got to build one.


For those of you who aren’t familiar with vacuum systems, the biggest challenge in working with a CNC router is holding material in place. Until now, I’d been using screws, double-sided tape, tabs and clamps to hold material down while the ShopBot did the cutting.


Now, instead of these laborious methods, we can use the power of vacuum to hold down plywood and other flat materials as the ShopBot cuts them. So, how does it work?


A vacuum system has essentially three parts: A vacuum source (in our case a powerful Fein shop-vac), a plenum, and a bleeder board. The plenum is the distribution system for the vacuum, and the bleeder board is the final layer of material which covers the plenum and is in contact with the material being cut.



Here’s a picture of the ShopBot with the plenum pattern and PVC plumbing installed. The grid pattern is cut into a sheet of ultralight MDF and sealed with polyurethane. The three valves under the machine let me isolate different vacuum ‘zones’, depending on the size of the material I’m cutting.


With the bleeder board installed, the system draws vacuum right through a solid sheet of ultralight MDF. When the system is turned on, the vacuum hold is so strong that I can push against the edge of a sheet of plywood without moving it at all.



Here’s the first piece I cut to test the system- Look Ma, No Tabs! Believe me, I’m delighted at the thought of never trimming another plywood tab. I’ll be putting it through some more tests in the coming days, but for now, NextFab has a much faster and cleaner way to cut your parts on the ShopBot!

Topics: Uncategorized, shopbot, nextfab, cnc

    

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Welcome to the NextFab Blog, where we discuss the ideas changing the world as we know it. Step inside the revolutionary world of 3D Printing technology, traditional and Computer Numerically Controlled (CNC) machinery, innovation and imagination.

 

 

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